Dispatches From Siberia #30: From Sentimental to Silly

Dispatches From Siberia #30: From Sentimental to Silly

Thursday morning, it struck me. My time in Russia is rapidly closing. I got an email asking me to start thinking about book orders for my fall courses. I made plans for an out-of-town trip, understanding that my window to travel around Russia is rapidly closing. I had lunch in a favorite spot and wondered how many more times I’ll get the opportunity to go there, to greet the hostess in strained Russian, and then to order and start working on a story while the grill is fired up and my food begins its path to awesomeness.

My students from the fall held a public reading of the work they produced. Since our course is the only institutionalized, university-level creative writing instruction that anyone seems to know of in Russia, it was kind of like the national MFA thesis presentation. That got emotional, too: hearing the work these students produced and knowing the path their work took from that first draft into some pretty spectacular fiction was a wonderful moment. I couldn’t be more proud of what they accomplished, or more excited for what they will do in the future—not to mention the community of writers that has started to build within just a few short months.

There’s a little sentimentality in all this, and an equal amount of panic. There’s so much I still want to do, to see, to write, to eat, to teach, and to learn. And I’ll have to weave all that in with rapidly approaching goodbyes to the kind and wonderful people I’ve met. I’m trying to take this realization more as a call to action than a prelude to sad departures, but it’s hard to do one without the other lingering nearby.

To compound the sentimentality, my parents are in the process of selling their home, meaning that between now and my arrival in the states, the last pieces of my adolescence will be unceremoniously packed into boxes and stacked in a storage facility somewhere on the east side of Cincinnati. This is one of the great problems and complexities of humanity, of course: the ever-present feeling of being stuck dead in the center of what’s passed already and what comes next. I’ll inhabit that complexity with fullness over the next nine weeks, and I look forward to whatever it might produce.

 One day, the arrival of spring means sunlight and strolls in the park...

One day, the arrival of spring means sunlight and strolls in the park...

Regular readers of this blog will know that Russian ground transport has been the bane of my existence, while air transport has been an utter delight.

This week, I actually had a fun bus experience. To most Americans (and probably most Russians) that will sound like quite the oxymoron. One such encounter amused me in brand new ways. On city buses, there’s generally a konduktor, someone who walks around the salon—the main bus compartment—and takes money or swipes transit cards, handing over little paper tickets in return. As I’ve mentioned before, individual bus owners and companies of various sizes contract with the city to cover certain routes. Every company has a different type of ticket and a slightly different procedure. Thursday afternoon, I jumped onto one of the most rickety buses I’ve seen in Novosibirsk. Windows were cracked, the sign displaying the route was half-fastened, flapping in the breeze. One of the wheels moved in an odd pattern, as if it had been struck from the side by another vehicle. But onboard, the konduktor was riding in style. The only reserved spot on the bus belongs to the conductor, who usually reserves it with something akin to a blanket or a small stadium seat. This lady had a leather massage chair strapped to her seat in the front of the bus. And in between stops, she was definitely using the massage function, tapping at the remote control while she talked on the phone. This might seem like a pretty small thing, but look at it this way: this is a thankless job, in which one spends their (usually her) day writhing between tight-packed passengers, collecting money from irritated travelers who wish they were moving much faster. The exchanges are frequently wordless, particularly when it comes to the word thanks. And yet this lady was making the work her own, making the most of it, getting whatever comfort she could out of something that seems like it could universally called an unpleasant job.

And then, I looked up at the wall of the bus, where a flat screen monitor showed that most wonderful of visages: the Russian Public Transportation Public Service Announcement Roll. This isn’t an official title of any sort, but it feels like it should be capitalized. This is basically a stream of silent PSAs that play constantly during one’s trip. In one classic, a bully seems primed to win the heart of a young woman when he shoves the PSA hero out of line in the school canteen. But the hero has a plan. The next day, when the bully pulls his Vespa up to the front door of the school to pick her up, the hero shows up on a high-stepping horse. They ride off together. The lesson ostensibly has something to do with brains over bullying, though I like to see it as more of an anti-scooter ad. I love scooters, but I feel like that would be a more interesting service announcement to make: buy your spoiled kid a scooter, and his date will definitely be stolen by a high-stepping horse. Now, where the kid kept the horse all day during school, or how the boy got out of class early enough to fetch it are beyond me, but sometimes, you just have to look beyond the plot holes and appreciate the art.

In another classic, an attractive woman is talking to a clearly of-age set of men, who seem artistic and are engaged in some park bench guitaring. She’s feeling it, until one of them pulls out a beer and takes a sip. The girl then sees a preppy guy approaching. Thank goodness she’s saved from the beer drinkers! The two rollerblade off into the park, and the guitar players are left to cry into their very small beer bottle.

 ...and the next day might bring a gloom that would have made Elliot Smith sadder. But it's oddly refreshing to have rain back in my life after a five-month absence.

...and the next day might bring a gloom that would have made Elliot Smith sadder. But it's oddly refreshing to have rain back in my life after a five-month absence.

One film is just dramatically cropped footage of exploded propane tanks, which cascade by with the intensity of a mid 1990s driver’s ed crash compilation video.

In one, a little girl offers a young man fruit. Instead, he spends the day eating random ethnic foods. At the end of the day, he’s doubled-over in stomach pain when the girl returns with a tangerine, which apparently makes everything alright. It’s obviously about healthy eating, but methinks I doth detect a cultural subtext at work.

Finally, there’s a slow-motion soccer game in which a young woman’s attention is stolen (any themes developing here?) from a pair of guys who have just tried their first cigarette. They can’t compete with the flowing mane and goal scoring skills of a dude who looks to be at least 10 years older than the other actors. No rollerblades this time, but the same general effect. These videos are solid gold: they’re the lone thing that keeps me going as the bus fills up, the conductor shoves her way through the mass of bodies, and my face gets shoved up against the window for the dozenth time. Because eventually, that little girl is going to come back with that healthy little tangerine, and much like the actor’s burrito-induced stomach ache, all will be made well.

The opinions expressed in this blog are my own and do not represent the Fulbright Program or the U.S. Department of State.

Dispatches From Siberia #27: Current Currency

Dispatches From Siberia #27: Current Currency

Money can be as tough to translate as language, if not more so: with currency exchanges, cultural norms, and value discrepancies, cash fluency is a moving target.

Dispatches From Siberia #26: Playing Tour Guide

Dispatches From Siberia #26: Playing Tour Guide

Showing your city to others is a great way to learn about how you interact with it. Last week, a pair of fellow Fulbrighters based a few hours north accompanied a group of students to Novosibirsk. In between the group’s scheduled tour of the zoo and attendance at the opera, we met up and I got a chance to show some colleagues around my adopted city.

The time constraints led us to stay in the city center, where we checked out the famous teal constructivist-style train station, took a stroll down the city’s primary pedestrian street, and had a late lunch. If this sounds more relaxed than exciting, that’s sort of the point.

 Remember last week when I said spring had arrived? Well, technically it has, but don't tell the clouds and this car that.

Remember last week when I said spring had arrived? Well, technically it has, but don't tell the clouds and this car that.

The quick tour, just a couple hours including food, made me appreciative that I’ve gotten to know Novosibirsk as an inhabitant and not as a tourist. As a tourist, I would have been underwhelmed. Frankly, there’s not a ton to do in the walkable center. There is certainly good food, and the aforementioned zoo and theatre undoubtedly make up a hefty percentage of the trip for many foreign visitors, because these are the most accessible interesting places. But to really appreciate the city, it takes a deeper dive—and most of the more interesting places are far-flung enough that a short-span tourist would likely never find them—or would spend the whole trip traveling back and forth between a very limited number of actual sites. The Monument of Glory, for example, takes less than an hour to see and appreciate, but the trip there—between public transit and the walks between bus or metro stops—would eat up half a day and perhaps more if the traveller was just getting her or his bearings in the town. Akademgorodok, which is listed in nearly every tourist guide as one of the most interesting spots in Novosibirsk, can take well over ahour to reach from the city center, depending on traffic and bus connections. A visit to the City of Academics would take nearly a full day from a traveler’s Novosibirsk itinerary.

Other cities I’ve visited, such as Irkutsk, Krasnoyarsk, Kazan, Nizhny Novgorod, and Ekaterinburg, have more centralized, walkable zones filled with the key touristic sites. There was plenty to do during a couple of days, and the sites were clustered close enough together to be easily reachable. Did I miss some things in those cities? Absolutely. But these smaller and more compact cities are friendlier for those just stopping through. I feel like I got to enjoy the very best of those interesting places in a way I might not have been able to do on a quick breeze

It’s harder to do that in Novosibirsk, and so I’m glad I’ve gotten to dive deep into this place.

So, which genuine, authentic Siberian restaurant did I take the visiting scholars to? Well, the Mexican restaurant, obviously. Listen: both colleagues live and work in Tomsk, which is about four hours away and a third the size of Novosibirsk. With plenty of authentic regional food available in Tomsk, we opted for a different flavor: something familiar.

 Georgian food is incredible, and prevalent in Novosibirsk. But when guests come to the city, we skip the local and find a taste of home.

Georgian food is incredible, and prevalent in Novosibirsk. But when guests come to the city, we skip the local and find a taste of home.

The steak fajitas were a hit, and the burrito appeared to be solid. I can also vouch for the queso (which is spicy, rich, and full of mildly cooked red peppers) even though no one partook during this particular lunch. The cheesecake, I hear, was take-or-leaveable, but sometimes when you haven’t had cheesecake in months, you see it on the menu and you have to try.

When travelling for a brief time, it’s worthwhile to spend as many meals as possible enjoying local cuisine, but when you live in a foreign land for an extended time, it’s okay to go for a little flavor of home now and then. Sometimes—don’t judge me—that even means a trip to KFC.

A few weeks ago, I mentioned some of the lessons I’ve learned in Siberia. One of those included avoiding hot beverages when the temperature plummets, and a couple of readers have asked for clarification. So, without further ado, here is my vastly oversimplified version of the science: basically, when you drink hot liquid such as coffee or tea, the tissue in your mouth and throat expand, in much the same way ones pores open during a warm shower. The next cold breath, then, injects brutally cold air deep into your throat tissue. Not a pleasant thought, right? Here’s another example: think about how asphalt expands and contracts in changing weather. Add some moisture to the mix, and by the time all the havoc’s done, you get a street full of potholes. This is why no one walks around Siberia with a cup of fresh coffee when the temperature hits negative thirty: they’ve got no interest in a throat full of potholes.

 Siberian coffee: best enjoyed inside (and with waffles).

Siberian coffee: best enjoyed inside (and with waffles).

On that cheery note, we’ll wrap up for the week. Next time, I’ll have some stories about spring classes, currency exchanges, and whatever other blissful mayhem I run across in the meantime.

Fulbright Disclaimer: The views expressed in this blog are my own and do not represent the Fulbright Program or the U.S. Department of State.

 

Dispatches From Siberia #21: Being the Stranger in Need

Dispatches From Siberia #21: Being the Stranger in Need

This week, while my vulnerability was great, an Asian immigrant in an Islamic city deep in the heart of Russia stood by the side of a sick, suffering tourist from Middle America until he was certain everything was okay. That’s the kind of moment that permanently disables a person’s ability to hate, and it’s a sort of moment more people should encounter.

Dispatches From Siberia #20: Points Of No Return

Dispatches From Siberia #20: Points Of No Return

No matter which flavors and sights might escape me as I leave one town for the next, there’s always a next, wonderful place waiting with a new batch of kind, curious, and giving people.    

Dispatches From Siberia #19: Ikea Kitchens and Hand-Made Homes

Dispatches From Siberia #19: Ikea Kitchens and Hand-Made Homes

My weeks seem to be settling in to a bit of a pattern: an exciting week, followed by a calm one full of work. This week was the calm one, but there were still a few chances to explore.

Notably: I had dinner in an Ikea display.

Yes, full-on, 500 Days of Summer-style, except there was actual food.

One of Novosibirsk’s major western-style malls was spurned by a prospective tenant after a large space had already been cleared. Instead of leaving a big chuck of the mall vacant, Ikea—an anchor tenant in the complex—rented the space and set up an innovative spot called место есть, literally “There is Space.” There is a stage and an area for regional experts to give lectures and workshops on all sorts of topics, a bookshop, a café, and a small shop that sells Ikea branded packaged foods. But the really interesting part of the space is that they’ve set up a series of functioning kitchens and dining rooms. Groups can reserve the spaces (for free!), bring their own food along, and spend time cooking, trying out Ikea gear, and dining, all just one velvet rope away from the curious public.

It struck me as a particularly great idea in a city with a large youth population and lots of flats that don’t have huge areas in which to entertain. If you’re going to have a dinner party, why not have it in an Ikea display? There were four or five different areas—of which ours was the least extravagant. But the touch-screen stoves, the new cabinet models, and the Ikea cookware were fun to explore while a small group of colleagues and friends hung out in the middle of a giant shopping mall. To cap the whole deal off, they gave each of us a coupon on the way out. What a thoughtful marketing idea, while also offering the store’s customers a chance to interact in a cool, new way. 

Perhaps my most educational opportunity of the week was a trip to the left bank of Novosibirsk to explore the world of Russian single-family housing. In many western countries, a stand-alone house is widely regarded as a socially desirable thing. In many eastern countries, having a flat, condo, or apartment is the more prestigious option, because of the convenience it provides. But that wasn’t the interesting part of the trek, which was extremely cold

 A handmade house next to what westerners might view as a more traditional structure.

A handmade house next to what westerners might view as a more traditional structure.

Myself and a past Fulbright grantee who is back in Novosibirsk this week visiting some friends were guided by an activist who monitors building practices. He’s also built his own house, and he took us on a walk through the suburbs. In addition to touring us through a fairly new Russian Orthodox church, he spent several (very cold) hours showing us the way found materials are often incorporated into homes.

I often see folks of a couple of particular political ideologies arguing for the dissolution of “regulations” in all their various and sundry forms. If one wants to see the end result of a regulation-free marketplace, the Russian building process is Exhibit A. In residential neighborhoods, a person purchases or rents property, a city employee comes and draws a red line on the ground indicating the allowable building site, and then the builder has at it.

 A variety of housing styles in a west Novosibirsk suburb.

A variety of housing styles in a west Novosibirsk suburb.

Want to make your house out of used railroad ties? Have at it. (We saw several.) Don’t want—or can’t afford—shingles for the roof? Buy a skein of expired vinyl previously used as a billboard and tack it to the roofboards. We saw homes roofed by a cola ad, a deodorant ad, and maybe most interesting, an old lingerie billboard. We saw sites where three different levels were built in three different areas from three different materials. One home was made from scraps of old furniture. Next door to it was a modern, three story home that would have fit into any major American city’s suburbs. Many of the builders handle their own electricity and plumbing, whether or not they’ve got any training. Often, the building is a process of trial and error. Our host explained that he came across a problem while running electric in his own home. The available wires wouldn’t work with the energy-efficient sockets and bulbs he’d installed. The problem, it turned out, was that too much energy was being diverted to the indicator light on the wall switch—the one that lights up to show that the power is on. He cut into the wire casing, cut the wire that led to the indicator light, and his fixtures began to work.

While trial and error worked in that instance, it had failed the community more broadly. As he showed us around his house-in-progress, a backhoe worked outside, dismantling the road. Not too long ago, the community’s pipes needed replaced. Instead of buying pipes, a few residents decided they could handle it more cheaply by building and installing their own water pipe. I’m still a little foggy on the details of how this transpired, and the process by which a couple of guys make their own municipal water pipe, but the end result was that the neighborhood’s water supply this week consisted of buckets full of melted snow.

 This house combines found materials and commercially available construction components.

This house combines found materials and commercially available construction components.

With no particular building regulations in place, no one second-guessed the idea. When the pipe collapsed this week, the self-installation of the self-built pipe left residents with another problem: there were no manholes to allow access that would allow workers to isolate the problem area. In the end, about a third of the street was ultimately dug up over the course of the last week, until the water started flowing just as we were about to leave the home.

Are we overregulated in the States? Maybe—but it’s at least debatable. My tour on Thursday, though, left a resounding image of what happens when folks are left totally to their own devices. Let’s just say regulations aren’t necessarily as evil as folks sometimes try to portray them. For reasons of safety, comfort, or in some cases, the common good of the community, some common guidelines are a very, very nice thing to have around. Trust me.

Next week, I’m back to some adventure: I’ll travel around the region for a few days before heading to Moscow for a conference the following week.

Between now and then, I get yet another holiday: the Gregorian calendar, still used by some segments of the Russian population, provides a second New Year this Saturday, so technically I still haven’t broken any resolutions.

 

Fulbright Disclaimer: The views reflected in this blog are my own and do not represent the U.S. Department of State or the Fulbright Program. 

Dispatches From Siberia #18: My Snow Day Was Better Than Yours

Dispatches From Siberia #18: My Snow Day Was Better Than Yours

I started this week by ringing in the new year at a party in an abandoned Soviet-era metro station/bunker and finished it up with a snowball fight on top of a frozen sea. In between, I was able to have my first unscripted, reactive conversations during Russian lessons, I thumped out the first 12,000 words of a new book, and finally got tickets to see the Novosibirsk professional hockey team play. It’s been a good new year.

As the end of 2016 approached, I saw a distinct trend online: an incredibly high percentage of friends posted sentiments to this general effect: “I know I’m supposed to think 2016 was miserable, but it was actually a pretty good year for me because…” And then the obligatory addendum: “But, don’t get me wrong, it was still a bad year because politics happened and people died and so on.”

I’ll offer the same addendum. Some awful things happened. All over the world, good people died, bad people had success, worse people treated others poorly, and the protestors of the poor treatment were ignored and met with more ugly behavior. But the trend of people having quietly good years under this backdrop is hopeful. Because at the end of the day, most of has have control of nothing more than our own quiet lives. I’m of the opinion that our job as humans on this earth is primarily to be as good to each other when we’re able, to resist and attack evil at every opportunity, and to work together toward these ends when possible. I wish that my sphere of influence were larger. I wish I were in charge of producing a list of presidential cabinet nominees, and that I were in charge of determining whether the people with whom I share a national identity were capable of being racists, criminals, or generally bad people. I think I’d make some pretty reasonable decisions on those fronts, but unfortunately, I don’t get to.

What I do get to do is interact with the great people I love, and to engage in work that I hope will inspire other people to make better choices about the concepts listed above.

Simply, I refuse to be bullied into adopting the idea that personal misery is a badge of honor. I plan to do what good I can for as many people as I’m able, to engage in my work in a way that lifts up as many people as possible and encourages them to be loving and gracious, and to resist panicking about the things I can’t change. That’s been my mode of operation so far in 2017, and it’s yielded new friends, professional success, and new possibilities. That doesn’t mean I won’t find complaints and faults with the world around me and even my community. But for me, personally, the collective handwringing at which so many of us have become so skilled just isn’t effective enough any longer. I’ll spend this year, and hopefully those after it, working to be the best human I can be and producing the best work I can in hopes of helping others to become better, too.

 Hockey at the Novosibirsk Ice Palace.

Hockey at the Novosibirsk Ice Palace.

The hockey game I witnessed Tuesday afternoon was particularly interesting, partially because of the opponent. Novosibirsk defeated Yaroslalvl Locomotiv in a shootout. If Locomotiv sounds vaguely familiar to you, it’s probably because of a devastating event. They team’s players, coaches, and support staff were killed in a 2011 plane crash, eerily similar to the 1970 crash of the football team’s plane for which my home campus, Marshall University, is so well known. Similar to the NCAA’s relaxation of some rules to help the MU team get back on its feet, the Kontinental Hockey League relaxed some rules about foreign players, and Yaroslavl is once again a national powerhouse and a national symbol of a team working to overcome adversity.

 Preparing the arsenal for a snowball fight. There is a lake underneath for four feet of compressed snow and foot of ice that support me.

Preparing the arsenal for a snowball fight. There is a lake underneath for four feet of compressed snow and foot of ice that support me.

On Thursday, I got to spend some time withFulbright alumnus who returned to Novosibirsk to visit friends, faculty, and students from his time in the community. A group of us trekked to the Ob Sea, an enormous man-made lake south of central Novosibirsk. We spent a couple of hours walking on the frozen sea, engaging in some pretty compelling snowball fights, and generally enjoying the season. Playing in six-foot-deep snowdrifts might not be everybody’s cup of tea, but when there’s been snow on the ground nonstop since mid-October, you’re eventually forced to make a decision about the world of powdery white around you: sulk in your room or learn to enjoy it. I think the attached photos should give you a pretty good idea of which direction I chose on that question.

Tomorrow is Russian Christmas. One of the Russian customs I’ve taken to heart is the way that parents teach their children to interact with the holiday.

 Children at the "Gallery Novosibirsk" shopping center visit Ded Moroz and regale hime with poems for the New Year and Christmas.

Children at the "Gallery Novosibirsk" shopping center visit Ded Moroz and regale hime with poems for the New Year and Christmas.

Russian parents take their children to see Ded Moroz (Russian Santa, essentially) just like America parents, but with one notable difference. Instead of the children presenting a list of wants and demands, the children recite a poem as a gift to Ded Moroz—often one that they’ve composed themselves. Then, they accept whatever he gives them with gratitude.

Now, certainly I understand the origin of the Santa wish list: it’s a great way for parents to gather information about what their kids want. But what a great lesson to teach. Give before you ever expect anything in turn, and be grateful whenever something unearned comes your way. Also, the tradition doubles as one big, national poetry workshop, and you simply can’t go wrong with that.

Next week: more hockey, more writing and—wait for it—more snow.

Fulbright Disclaimer: the views represented in this blog are my own and do not represent the Fulbright Program or the U.S. Department of State.

 

Dispatches from Siberia # 17: People Who Made the Year Bright

Dispatches from Siberia # 17: People Who Made the Year Bright

A little kindness, I learned, goes a long way, especially concerning the people who serve others all day. Throughout all my travels and my moves, some of the most wonderful people I’ve met have been in the service industry. Hostel managers and clerks from my travels around Europe. A Starbucks barista who became a friend, a band mate and will be a groomsman for me in a few months. The cleaning guys at the newspaper office. These are the people I’ve connected with most and learned the most from over the years, and the same holds true in Novosibirsk.

Dispatches From Siberia #16: The Physics of Staying Upright on Ice

Ever wonder why Russians have a reputation for strength in the sciences? My best guess, based on personal experience, is that they’ve got to use so much science every day to navigate and survive.

Everyone is an amateur astronomer, interpreting the evening skies, understanding the atmospheric conditions that cause them, and predicting what the wind, the clouds, and—most importantly—the temperature will do.

Everyone is a chemist, sorting out which foods and which drinks at which temperatures are good and bad for the body, which reactions will be beneficial, and which can leave one on their back upon an operating table. Drinking hot beverages outside for example, is a no-go: the hot liquid expands throat tissue and welcomes in all sorts of unpleasant reactions, vascular responses, and various other circumstances, most of which sound connected to doctor’s offices. Carry your coffee outside, sure—but don’t sip it until you’re safely indoors.

 The strategies for walking effectively on snow-topped ice are as numerous as they are intricate.

The strategies for walking effectively on snow-topped ice are as numerous as they are intricate.

But physics: that’s the big one. Walking in winter is a six-month, active dissertation in controlling the body with and against the laws of physics. Walking on ice is all about momentum. Adjusting the speed of ascent and descent. Never, never, never stopping if it can be helped. Calculating for the grade of a sidewalk and keeping those critical changes in speed as gradual as possible. Between the entrance to my flat and the bus stop that connects me to the rest of Novosibirsk, there is a pair of parallel sidewalks. One sloped gradually downward, hugging the edge of a narrow street. The other remains flat until a flight of stairs at one end, which leads up to the bus stop. Before the ice, my formative experience as a (very slow) cross-country runner taught me to take the ramp: the diagonal would slightly decrease my workload. Once the ice came, it was a different story: take the stairs and get on flat ground as quickly as possible. The slope means a battle with physics, all the way up or all the way down, depending on the time of day. When someone walks slowly in front of you, there are calculations to be made. Can you pass the walker without one or both persons winding up on the ground? How much is the slow-walking person swerving? How much will you have to speed up or slow down, and how quickly?

It’s more math than I’m comfortable with, frankly, but it’s critical for staying upright.

There are other problem solving tools, too. Shoes with a sharp right angle in the heel are useful: if you strike heel-first, there’s some grip against the ice. There’s also the most critical tool, eternal vigilance. Anything that looks smooth is a bad idea. Anything that looks soft might get you 20-inches deep into a snowdrift. When I played basketball, coaches taught us to defend by keeping our eye always on the ball. The offensive player, after all, can’t go anywhere without first moving the ball. In Russia, you take a similar approach to the ground. Anything you might run into is likely connected to the ground. You can identify people by their feet, signs by their posts, bins by their base, buildings by their footers. There’s no reason to look up. Look away from the ice ground you’re trying to walk, most likely you’ll wind up on your back.

So, like for me during the past few weeks has boiled down to these two critical rules: physics is your friends, and never look up.

Of course, there’s a third option: stay inside.

 When the temperature looks like this, staying inside is a good option.

When the temperature looks like this, staying inside is a good option.

I’ve done a lot of that lately, too, especially as the temperature hovers around negative 30, Celsius.

When I’ve gotten out and about lately, it’s been largely work related. The first group of the Siberian Writers Workshop had their final meetings this week. They’ll have some time to revise their wonderful stories before submitting final portfolios, but their work was brave, bold, and exciting this semester. I’m looking for ward to reading their polished work, and also to meeting additional groups of students during the spring term.

 An image from Novosibirsk State University's press release recapping the Horizons of Journalism Conference, which included students from Russia, China, and Central Asia.

An image from Novosibirsk State University's press release recapping the Horizons of Journalism Conference, which included students from Russia, China, and Central Asia.

A few weeks ago, I had a chance to speak with a large group of students at a journalism conference, and we discussed the modes of storytelling in fiction, journalistic nonfiction, and in plain, simple daily interaction. One of my fellow presenters, a lecturer at Novosibirsk State University, invited me to come to the school’s campus in Akademgorodok to speak with some geologists who are studying English in order to broaden their professional possibilities. In addition to speaking with them about language and American culture, I was privileged to judge their end-of semester group projects. A couple of the groups finished neck-and-neck, and so there was only one logical way to solve it: dance contest. It was awesome to connect with some students, but perhaps even more exciting to watch students from an intensive and prestigious university cutting loose a little bit at the end of a long term and a high-pressure presentation situation. It reminded me—and I hope reinforced to them—that no matter how serious your pursuits, there’s always room for a little fun.

Fulbright Disclaimer: The views expressed in this blog are my own and do not represent those of the Fulbright Program and the U.S. Department of State.

Dispatches From Siberia #15: A Week of Words

Dispatches From Siberia #15: A Week of Words

You know how sometimes you have a week that starts so disastrously you wish you could hide away in your room for a week and emerge in time to re-do the whole thing seven days later? The nice thing about having a grant in creative writing is that this sort of thing is actually encouraged, and I took full advantage this week.

Dispatches from Siberia #13: Vacation's Over

Dispatches from Siberia #13: Vacation's Over

For a few moments, I played the grump: that whole I-discovered-it-before-you-what-are-you-doing-here shtick, but then I found the place I wanted and parked myself in front of a plate of fruit dumplings and had a quick change of heart: the more the better. Other people are exploring. Learning. Seeing. It’s good for the town’s economy, good for the travelers, and I still got my dumplings. Everyone wins, even if I have to wait in line a bit.